Future Trends Resources

Times they are a changing….

Keeping up to date on the latest in emerging trends in the global digital landscape is essential for arts and media professionals.

Kate co-created and curates articles and submissions for Createasphere’s TransMedia Coalition and serves as their Managing Editor.  You’ll find excellent articles there on transmedia storytelling and new innovations in narrative storytelling.

Kate also has been posting a page of great content at FUTURE OF TRANSMEDIA on Facebook.

As a Senior Fellow with SNCR:  Society for New Communications Research and as Chair of the Global Arts and Media Node for The Millennium Project, Kate McCallum and her colleagues track trends in the arts, media and entertainment, and report on them to The Millennium Project constituency.

This collection of  blogs provides ongoing updates of the latest in storytelling, emerging trends in the arts and new entertainment technologies.  If you have updates or insights on additional emerging trends you wish to share please feel free to contact us with information and or links at kate@bridgeartsmedia.com.

100 Ideas That Changed Film

Posted on May 20, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

100 Ideas That Changed Film by Maria Popova How the seventh art went from magic lanterns to state-of-the-art computer-generated imagery in 100 years. When a small handful of enthusiasts gathered at the first cinema show at the Grand Cafe in Paris on December 27, 1895, to celebrate early experimental film, they didn’t know that over the next century, their fringe fascination would carve its place in history as the “seventh art.” But how, exactly, did that happen? In 100 Ideas that Changed Film, Oxford Times film reviewer David Parkinson and publisher Laurence King — who brought us 100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design and the epic Saul Bass monograph — offer a concise and intelligent chronicle of the most influential developments since the dawn of cinema. From technologies like magic lanterns (#1), the kinetoscope (#3), and the handheld camera (#78), to genres like slapstick (#21), poetic realism (#50), and queer cinema (#97), to system-level developments like the star system (#23), film schools (#38), and censorship (#48), to cultural phenomena like fan magazines (#31), television (#63), and feminist film theory (#86), the book blends the illuminating factuality of an encyclopedia with the strong point of view of a museum curator to reveal, beneath this changing flow of technologies and techniques, cinema’s deeper capacity for playing on universal emotions and engaging our timeless longing for escapism, entertainment, and self-expression. Parkinson promises in the introduction: What follows is as much a chronology of business opportunism and technical pragmatism, as a celebration of artistry, social commitment, and showmanship. Idea # 1: MAGIC LANTERNS Images from a set of 24 glass slides based on Sir John Tenniel’s original drawings for Alice in Wonderland   These optical lanterns contained the principal elements later found in film projectors: a source of illumination; a mechanism for moving frames through the light-proofed casing; and lenses for condensing and projecting images onto a distant screen. As an early form of mass entertainment, they also anticipated the storytelling experiments of later filmmakers. Idea # 20: SERIALS Betty Hutton relives the glory days of the silent serial in The Perils of Pauline, a 1947 biopic of the legendary chapterplay heroine, Pearl White.   Over 470 serials were produced in the United States between 1912 and 1956. In telling continuous stories in 10-15 weekly episodes of 15-25 minutes each, chapterplays, as they were also known, helped turn moviegoing into a habit. Idea # 28: GENRE Alfred Hitchcock so excelled at the thriller that he was nicknamed ‘The Master of Suspense’.   Idea # 36: EXPRESSIONISM This poster for The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) conveys the angularity of the stars and Walter Röhrig, Hermann Warm and Walter Reimann’s sets.   Employing exterior or objective representation to convey interior or subjective stats, the silent Schauerfilme (horror films), Kammerspielfilme (chamber dramas), and Strassenfilme(street films) produced in Weimar Germany between 1919 and 1929 continue to have a major influence on world cinema. Idea # 44: MUSICAL SCORES Riffing on the notes E and F, John Williams’s ‘shark’ theme proved crucial to ratcheting up the suspense in Jaws (1975).   Idea # 52: B MOVIES Shot in just three weeks, Jean Rollin’s Lèvres de Sang (1975) is a superior example of the erotic European horror Bs produced in the 1960s and ’70s.   Idea # 54: SHORTS Ben Turpin crosses Charlie Chaplin in Essanay’s two-reel lampoon of showbiz types, His New Job (1915).  ...

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Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art

Posted on May 20, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

Neil deGrasse Tyson on Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art by Maria Popova “Every child is a scientist.” Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson may well be the Richard Feynman of our day, a “Great Explainer” in his own right, having previously reflected on everything from the urgency of space exploration to the most humbling fact about the universe. In this short video, Tyson contributes a beautiful addition to this omnibus of notable definitions of science and explores subjects as diverse as the nature of originality and the future of artificial intelligence. Watch and take notes. I can’t think of any more human activity than conducting science experiments. Think about it — what do kids do? … They’re turning over rocks, they’re plucking petals off a rose — they’re exploring their environment through experimentation. That’s what we do as human beings, and we do that more thoroughly and better than any other species on Earth that we have yet encountered… We explore our environment more than we are compelled to utter poetry when we’re toddlers — we start doing that later. Before that happens, every child is a scientist. And so when I think of science, I think of a truly human activity — something fundamental to our DNA, something that drives curiosity. One particularly interesting line of thought examines the difference between originality in science and originality in art — a refreshing complement to last week’s tangential musings on the subject by Mark Twain and Henry Miller. If I discover a scientific idea, surely someone else would’ve discovered the same idea had I not done so. Whereas, look at Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” — if he didn’t paint “Starry Night,” nobody’s gonna paint “Starry Night.” So, in that regard, the arts are more individual to the creative person than a scientific idea is to the one who comes up with it — but, nonetheless, they are both human activities. Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign...

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10 Producers Who Will Change Hollywood in 2012

Posted on May 20, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

From THE WRAP Even Brian Grazer started with a little movie called “Splash,” starring a then-unknown Tom Hanks. True, that was a Disney movie, but the days when new producers can align with major studios are long gone. Now, to get a project off the ground, it takes workaday jacks-of-all-trades who spend their days scrambling to find projects and the money to finance them. And even when they taste success, they’re still juggling. “When ‘Margin Call’ won an Independent Spirit Award — and I have it on my mantle at home — it felt pretty great,” Neal Dodson, a partner with Zachary Quinto and Corey Moosa at Before the Door Pictures, told TheWrap. Also read: More Producers Who Are Making a Mark on Hollywood At the same time, “the first major benchmark for us will be a time when our movies aren’t sort of hand-to-mouth. Right now, we’re basically making fees on our movies that allow us to extend the life of our company for ‘X’ number of months,” he said. “I’d love to not be movie-to-movie. I’d like to be – movie to two movies.” Dodson, Moosa and Quinto — better known as “Star Trek’s” latest Spock — are among the most interesting young producers in Hollywood. Their projects are ambitious, challenging and successful. Also read: Michael Benaroya: Film Financier to Watch TheWrap has identified nine more like them: Hollywood’s future Grazers (and Robert Rodriguezes and Kevin Smiths). They are listed in alphabetical order. Keep your eye on them. ANNAPURNA PICTURES Megan Ellison The daughter of billionaire Oracle founder Larry Ellison, Megan Ellison has the financial ability to do pretty much what she pleases. And she’s chosen to make movies. Good ones. With talented directors. Her Annapurna Pictures has worked with Spike Jonze, Kathryn Bigelow and Paul Thomas Anderson. She executive produced 2010’s Oscar-nominated “True Grit” and smaller projects like 2010’s “Main Street,” starring Colin Firth and Ellen Burstyn. Her production company is executive producer on “Cogan’s Trade,” starring Brad Pitt, Ray Liotta and James Gandolfini, and producer of “Lawless,” both slated for release later this year by the Weinstein Co. Also read: The Ellison Kids: Billionaire Producers Making Their Mark on Hollywood “Cogan’s Trade,” is a mob drama from director Andrew Dominick, whose last film was the acclaimed “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.” “Lawless” is about a gang of bootleggers during the Depression who are threatened by authorities who want a cut of their action. The John Hillcoat film, which was formerly titled “The Wettest County,” stars Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Jessica Chastain, Guy Pearce and Shia LaBeouf.  With four projects in post-production and another filming, Ellison has established herself and her company as a significant force in Hollywood based on the quality of her output, even as she has remained low-key, shunning interview requests and the spotlight. To read the complete story visit the website at link at top of...

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Yahoo’s Movieland Games Content for Film Fans

Posted on May 17, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Yahoo’s Movieland games content for film fans Chris Marlowe / May 15, 2012 From Digital Media Wired Film fans can further indulge their passion with Movieland, a marketing and branded content initiative from Yahoo Movies and all four major studios. Designed as though it were a board game, Movieland encourages consumers to log in with Facebook, then explore and interact with customized content sourced from Universal Pictures, Warner Bros. Pictures, Lionsgate and Paramount Pictures. The studio partners have designated their top 35 summer movie releases, each of which represent a stop on the game board where users collect badges by buying movie tickets, answering trivia questions and watching trailers. Badge collections and ticket purchases make consumers eligible to win prizes. Yahoo Movies said it also will bring Movieland to International Comic-Con in July, where it will create a life-sized version of the game board that fans can physically walk through and interact with. Yahoo Movies, which reaches over 26 million U.S. users each month, currently features advertising and in some cases dedicated experience pages for Lionsgate’s What to Expect When You Are Expecting, Universal Pictures’Battleship,Warner Bros. Pictures’ Dark Shadows and others. It also hosts live red carpet premieres, exclusive clips, trailers and other content, which it intends to ramp up throughout the summer movie season, along with additional contests to win movie-related prizes like premiere tickets, signed posters and vacation packages. As with almost all other Yahoo initiatives, Yahoo Movies and Movieland are supported by editorial content and other Yahoo...

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TV Storytellers Push Plots, Characters Beyond Small Screen Into Social Media

Posted on May 17, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

TV Storytellers Push Plots, Characters Beyond Small Screen Into Social Media Connecting Talent and Brands With Fans Makes Good Content Better By: Jeanine Poggi Published: May 09, 2012 TV programmers are using social platforms to break through the traditional confines of storytelling that limit plots to just the small screen. Patrick Butler ‘Mob Wives’ star Drita D’Avanzo speaks with Kristin Frank, SVP-digital at MTV and VHI, and TV personality Jim Shearer during a panel on leveraging social media to connect talent, fans and brands at Ad Age’s Social Engagement/Social TV Conference in New York. At Ad Age’s Social Engagement/Social TV conference taking place in New York on Wednesday, cable networks including Viacom’s MTV and VH1 and NBC Universal’s USA, explained how they are leveraging social media to connect fans with talent and brands and how they are using these platforms to influence story lines.At MTV and VH1, Kristin Frank, senior VP-digital, said they are telling stories across all screens and in between episodes and seasons. “Fans don’t stop being fans when the show is over,” she said. The target audience for VH1 is adults between the age of 25 to 34 who are highly active in social media. This demographic represents $1.1 trillion in purchasing power, she said. “These viewers demand immediate and frequent engagement,” Ms. Frank said. One way MTV and VH1 does this is by having their stars, like Drita D’Avanzo of “Mob Wives,” build one-on-one relationships with viewers through social-media platforms such as Twitter. With more than 300,000 followers, Ms. D’Avanzo sends out tweets during episodes of the show. “It allows fans to feel like they are watching the show with you,” she said. “They want to see who else is watching and who else you know…They like watching me interact with other reality stars like Pauly D.” Ms. D’Avanzo also tries to directly respond to as many fan tweets as possible. Patrick Butler Matt Nix, creator and showruner of USA’s ‘Burn Notice’, speaks with TV Guide’s Mickey O’Connor about building social TV engagement at Ad Age’s Social Engagement/Social TV Conference Wednesday. Getting the stars of shows to engage with viewers through Twitter and Facebook is key for programmers, said Matt Nix, executive producer, creator and writer of USA Network’s “Burn Notice.” “The more excited people are, the more likely they are to watch the show live,” he said. “The amount of fan excitement is really important for those of us that live and die by the number of eyeballs watching.” Mr. Nix is also utilizing social platforms to get viewers to vote on a new title sequence for “Burn Notice,” whose sixth season premieres on June 14. Of course, social media isn’t a replacement for compelling programming. “There’s no amount of technology that can make bad content good,” Ms. Frank said, “but technology can make good content...

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Why producing for multiple platforms is good for storytelling & for business….

Posted on May 15, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

FROM MIPBLOG May 11, 2012 Nuno Bernardo: Why producing for multiple platforms is good for storytelling… & for business Transmedia IP Beat Girl (photo) is the latest of many to tell its story across several platforms. Here’s why! By Nuno Bernardo In 2002, when I was taking a small handmade promo of Sofia’s Diary to broadcasters, mobile operators and portals, I had no idea about the potential of a cross-media property and the way audiences were changing their habits of watching entertainment, especially television. I just knew that I had this little character that had these small stories that I wanted to be heard (and broadcast). What I did know at the time was that it didn’t make any sense to limit the content to just one platform. Internet or mobile usage was exploding, especially with teenagers and young adults, and they were being used to tell the story we wanted to tell without the limits or the formats of TV broadcast. This self-funded cross-media approach paid off and let our small story become a mass-market phenomenon, becoming one of the top TV Shows on Portuguese broadcaster RTP, a book sensation with almost half-million books sold and a licensing hit. In 2006 the show went international and is now localised in 10 territories around the globe. Sofia’s Diary was shaped around the concept that linear broadcast content was becoming less and less effective as a way to attract and keep audiences. Not that television was dying, but digital technologies were allowing audiences to shape their own entertainment experience. Personal Video Recorders and the Internet-based devices allowed each person to create their own schedule. The industry does not seem to be catching up with this new paradigm. Broadcasters are still focusing on formats and content aimed at the linear TV broadcast market. More than 90% of their content is created for TV broadcast, and the internet and digital are just other windows to re-run the TV material. Original web (or digital commissions) or web-only licensing are still a rarity, although broadcaster’s websites, VOD services and other forms of on-demand entertainment already count as a significant part of their daily audiences. The big challenge to producers and broadcasters is to understand the fact that different media requires different languages, approaches and probably different storytelling structures and formats. Historically, new media (cinema, radio and TV were once new media) in their early years usually borrowed their language from existing media. As these “new media” grew up and conquered audiences, they developed their own language and formats. Webisodes, made for the Web and mobile platform digital content, still borrow most of there structure from TV. Most of the time the content consumed on these platforms is repurposed TV shows, broadcasted on its original format or “chopped” into smaller pieces with shorter durations. But as audiences evolve and become more sophisticated, more and more producers understand that repurposing content is not the best approach. The result is we are now seeing big TV shows (and some movies and popular video games) having their own spin-off web series, mobile or companion tablet games and digital comic books or eBooks. If the main motivation of producers and broadcasters is monetising the popularity of their TV or movie brands on new platforms, or generating additional revenues by selling apps or digital downloads to their fan base,...

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Arts Initiative: Arts Education is Education Reform

Posted on May 12, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Turnaround Arts Initiative: Arts Education is Education Reform Posted on 03 May 2012 Posted on: May 1, 2012 The President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities (PCAH) is embarking on the most exciting new arts education initiative yet. Turnaround Arts, created in cooperation with the US Department of Education and the White House Domestic Policy Council, is a public-private partnership designed to transform some of our country’s lowest performing elementary and middle schools using intensive arts curriculums.  Turnaround Arts will work in Sarah Jessica Parker, others join Obama arts education push Posted on 26 Apr 2012 By David NgApril 25, 2012, 8:30 a.m. The Obama administration has enlisted a handful of prominent screen actors — including Sarah Jessica Parker, Kerry Washington, Forest Whitaker and Alfre Woodard — to help promote Turnaround Arts, an initiative launched this week to incorporate arts education in troubled schools. Turnaround Arts is a program from the President’s Committee on the Arts. The two-year pilot project has selected eight school http://turnaroundarts.pcah.gov/overview/ TAI: Turnaround Arts Initiative » Overview What The President’s Committee’s Turnaround Arts initiative, created in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Educationand the White House Domestic Policy Council, is a public-private partnership designed to help transform some the nation’s lowest performing schools through comprehensive and integrated arts education. Developed from the recommendations in PCAH’s recent report Reinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future Through Creative Schools, the Committee’s landmark research publication of May 2011, Turnaround Arts will test the hypothesis that high-quality and integrated arts education can be an effective tool to strengthen school reform efforts-boosting academic achievement and increasing student motivation in schools facing some of the toughest educational challenges in the country. Why The first federal study of research data on the effectiveness of arts education in over a decade, Reinvesting in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future through Creative Schools (May 2011) analyzed the challenges and opportunities in arts education in America. Turnaround Arts puts into practice several of the recommendations in the report, including using arts education as a powerful tool for whole school reform in high poverty, low-performing schools, and the need for a wider range of evidence on its impact. Studies included in this report show that when students participate in the arts they are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, have higher GPA/SAT scores, and demonstrate a 56 percent improvement in spatial-temporal IQ scores. They show significantly higher levels of mathematics proficiency by grade 12, are more engaged and cooperative with teachers and peers, and are more self-confident and better able to express their ideas. These benefits are particularly pronounced in high-poverty, low-performing schools, and work in tandem with other pedagogical approaches. Arts education works best as a part of overall school and education reform strategy. A recent follow-up study commissioned by the National Endowment for the Arts, Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth: Findings from Four Longitudinal Studies, by chief researcher James Catterall, confirms the value of arts rich education, especially for low socio-economic status youth, in academic achievement, completion of high school and college, and becoming more active and engaged citizens (April 2012). Yet according to the recent FRSS (Fast Response Survey System) study of access to arts education issued by the U.S. Department of Education, Arts Education in the Public Elementary and Secondary Schools 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 (April 2012),...

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RIDES – A New Transmedia Platform

Posted on May 2, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

An overview of RIDES interactive transmedia platform that adds a whole new level to viewing high quality content on your computer or your mobile device or both.  And it’s the engine that runs DIRTY WORK and our other shows.  

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Evidence Builds That Meditation Strengthens the Brain, Researchers Say

Posted on Apr 25, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Evidence Builds That Meditation Strengthens the Brain, Researchers Say

Evidence builds that meditation strengthens the brain, researchers say March 14, 2012 in Neuroscience Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit. Transcendental Meditation – Try a method that is effective and natural. Learn the benefits today. – www.TM.org How to do Meditation? – Discover 3 ways how to experience deeper meditation in minutes… – www.omharmonics.com Eileen Luders, an assistant professor at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, and colleagues, have found that long-term meditators have larger amounts of gyrification (“folding” of the cortex, which may allow the brain to process information faster) than people who do not meditate. Further, a direct correlation was found between the amount of gyrification and the number of meditation years, possibly providing further proof of the brain’s neuroplasticity, or ability to adapt to environmental changes. The article appears in the online edition of the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of neural tissue. Among other functions, it plays a key role in memory, attention, thought and consciousness. Gyrification or cortical folding is the process by which the surface of the brain undergoes changes to create narrow furrows and folds called sulci and gyri. Their formation may promote and enhance neural processing. Presumably then, the more folding that occurs, the better the brain is at processing information, making decisions, forming memories and so forth. “Rather than just comparing meditators and non-meditators, we wanted to see if there is a link between the amount of meditation practice and the extent of brain alteration,” said Luders. “That is, correlating the number of years of meditation with the degree of folding.” The researchers took MRI scans of 50 meditators, 28 men and 22 women, and compared them to 50 control subjects matched for age, handedness and sex. The scans for the controls were obtained from an existing MRI database, while the meditators were recruited from various meditation venues. The meditators had practiced their craft on average for 20 years using a variety of meditation types — Samatha, Vipassana, Zen and more. The researchers applied a well-established and automated whole-brain approach to measure cortical gyrification at thousands of points across the surface of the brain. They found pronounced group differences (heightened levels of gyrification in active meditation practitioners) across a wide swatch of the cortex, including the left precentral gyrus, the left and right anterior dorsal insula, the right fusiform gyrus and the right cuneus. Perhaps most interesting, though, was the positive correlation between the number of meditation years and the amount of insular gyrification. “The insula has been suggested to function as a hub for autonomic, affective and cognitive integration,” said Luders. “Meditators are known to be masters in introspection and awareness as well as emotional control and self-regulation, so the findings make sense that the longer someone has meditated, the higher the degree of folding in the insula.” While Luders cautions that genetic and other environmental factors could have contributed to the effects the researchers observed, still, “The positive correlation between gyrification and the number of practice years supports the idea thatmeditation enhances regional gyrification.” Provided by University of California – Los...

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Music Peace

Posted on Apr 25, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

Music Peace

This is a fulldome show called MUSIC PEACE that was created by Immersive Experience Producer Brian Quandt and Visual Artist Miles Regis.  The piece premiered in the Vortex Dome at THE STATE OF THE ARTS 2011 PRODUCING CHANGE event we hosted at LA Center Studios:...

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