Future Trends Resources

Times they are a changing….

Keeping up to date on the latest in emerging trends in the global digital landscape is essential for arts and media professionals.

Kate co-created and curates articles and submissions for Createasphere’s TransMedia Coalition and serves as their Managing Editor.  You’ll find excellent articles there on transmedia storytelling and new innovations in narrative storytelling.

Kate also has been posting a page of great content at FUTURE OF TRANSMEDIA on Facebook.

As a Senior Fellow with SNCR:  Society for New Communications Research and as Chair of the Global Arts and Media Node for The Millennium Project, Kate McCallum and her colleagues track trends in the arts, media and entertainment, and report on them to The Millennium Project constituency.

This collection of  blogs provides ongoing updates of the latest in storytelling, emerging trends in the arts and new entertainment technologies.  If you have updates or insights on additional emerging trends you wish to share please feel free to contact us with information and or links at kate@bridgeartsmedia.com.

Diginfo.tv GREAT resource for cutting edge new tech

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

NTT Docomo are currently developing a 3D Live Communication System and have presented it as a possible next step beyond regular video calls. During the conversation, words take the form of images in the virtual space shared by the users, enhancing the feeling that even though the users may be physically far away from each other, they are in a shared space. This virtual space is composed in the Docomo network cloud and streamed directly to each users device. “One feature of this system is speech recognition technology. This extracts characteristic keywords from the spoken words, and embodies them as objects.” “Another feature is spatial recognition technology, which tracks 360° videos or 3D objects as if you’re actually looking at them. So if you look in from above, the object appears as seen from above, and if you look in sideways, the object appears as seen from the side.” AR markers are used, with the conversation partners positions fixed, and by changing the orientation of the tablet they can explore the virtual space. In the current technology demonstration, experiences based on certain content keywords have been created, so users can be transformed into certain animals, or they can warp to other virtual environments such as a theme park or the surface of the moon. Within these virtual environments, information can also be presented, and the users can discuss the information being shared. “Currently, the system needs a special range-imaging camera to make people appear in the space. But it isn’t necessary to put people in the space, so for example, if you just want to see a CG background, or share a travel video, we could provide this using just a tablet.” “Here, we’re just exhibiting a prototype of this technology. Regarding services actual customers could use, we’re still thinking about those, so we haven’t decided our timeline yet.” Posted by Don Kennedy and...

read more

Experience virtual worlds with the Docomo 3D Live Communication System

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

NTT Docomo are currently developing a 3D Live Communication System and have presented it as a possible next step beyond regular video calls. During the conversation, words take the form of images in the virtual space shared by the users, enhancing the feeling that even though the users may be physically far away from each other, they are in a shared space. This virtual space is composed in the Docomo network cloud and streamed directly to each users device. “One feature of this system is speech recognition technology. This extracts characteristic keywords from the spoken words, and embodies them as objects.” “Another feature is spatial recognition technology, which tracks 360° videos or 3D objects as if you’re actually looking at them. So if you look in from above, the object appears as seen from above, and if you look in sideways, the object appears as seen from the side.” AR markers are used, with the conversation partners positions fixed, and by changing the orientation of the tablet they can explore the virtual space. In the current technology demonstration, experiences based on certain content keywords have been created, so users can be transformed into certain animals, or they can warp to other virtual environments such as a theme park or the surface of the moon. Within these virtual environments, information can also be presented, and the users can discuss the information being shared. “Currently, the system needs a special range-imaging camera to make people appear in the space. But it isn’t necessary to put people in the space, so for example, if you just want to see a CG background, or share a travel video, we could provide this using just a tablet.” “Here, we’re just exhibiting a prototype of this technology. Regarding services actual customers could use, we’re still thinking about those, so we haven’t decided our timeline yet.” Posted by Don Kennedy and...

read more

NEW FRONTIER: Sundance Opens Up Conversation Between Hollywood & Tech

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

New Frontier: Sundance Opens Up Conversation Between Hollywood and Tech “It’s about story.” That’s pretty much the refrain you’ll get from everyone who works at Sundance, and it never gets old. In fact, it’s really rather refreshing each time you hear it considering that for most of Hollywood, it’s about money. But it’s no surprise that for Sundance, even when it’s about technology, it’s really about story. I recently sat down with Michelle Satter, founding director of the Feature Film Program, in the Sundance offices to chat about how their New Frontiers program is helping open up the conversation between filmmakers and the tech crowd to facilitate collaboration in the name of storytelling. “We wanted to come up with a different name than “transmedia,'” Satter said in reference to the New Frontier Story Lab inspired by the New Frontier exhibition held annually in Park City, Utah. For those of you who haven’t been to Sundance or skipped over that section of the festival, it’s primarily about artists working at the intersection of film, art and new media technology. What does that mean? You can take a look at some of the work online. Artists use film, games, mobile apps, performance and animation to create a unique platform by which to tell a story. “We put our stake in the ground around story, not technology… but the next generation of storytellers realizes that audiences want to participate and not just with an alternate ending to a film… We’re also looking to use technology to improve the integrity of storytelling. It’s not just for marketing.” For anyone who’s been getting their bread buttered on the Internet lately, you may have noticed your writings or short films have been reduced to the term “content,” which seems to remove some of the artistry associated with it — as if anything to fill the space will do. “For us, it’s not about developing content, it’s about developing stories and developing artists that work in between filmmaking and new media technologies” noted Satter. “It’s about how to connect pieces of a story into something greater than its parts.” Conversations needed to start happening between the storytellers and those in the tech sector looking to create technologies to enhance the narrative experience. Sundance recognized the need to get everyone in the same space, storytellers were calling for a greater understanding of the new media tools at their disposal and tech entrepreneurs were requiring an understanding of the mechanics of complex storytelling and world-building. To accomplish this, Sundance started rebuilding their New Frontier program around 2007 and it’s been gaining popularity and interest with each passing year. “In my years in the business, this is definitely the biggest shift [in technology] that’s happened,” said Satter. “There was desktop editing, cameras that made filmmaking cheaper and more accessible… but what’s happening now, it’s hard for everyone to keep up.” In 2011, Sundance held their inaugural New Frontier Lab. In a similar spirit to their screenwriting, directing and producing labs, the New Frontier lab exposes emerging artists to established technical advisors and screenwriters to develop “a rich story world with meaning,” said Satter. It was such a success, they’re continuing with the endeavor. And it looks to be an interesting outlet for experimentation that we should all be keeping...

read more

Immersive Education – The New Frontier!

Posted on Jun 6, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

Immersive Education, a Media Grid initiative, is an award-winning learning platform that combines interactive 3D graphics, commercial game and simulation technology, virtual reality, voice chat, Web cameras (webcams) and rich digital media with collaborative online course environments and classrooms. Immersive Education gives participants a sense of “being there” even when attending a class or training session in person isn’t possible, practical, or desirable, which in turn provides educators and students with the ability to connect and communicate in a way that greatly enhances the learning experience. Originally available only to university students, the next generation of Immersive Education is focused on a broad spectrum of academic and non-academic users (higher education, K-12, and corporate training)....

read more

Record-Setting Arena Projection Experience!

Posted on Jun 1, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

From ADOBE BEYOND Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Filed under: GentryMedia Sister Sites •ProVideo Coalition • David Atkins Enterprises and Digital Pulse use Adobe software for record-setting arena projection Todd_Kopriva | 05/22 Australian production studio delivers animation for the 12th Arab Games, on record-size projection space, using Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects.   In December 2011, the 12th quadrennial Arab Games took place in Doha, Qatar at Khalifa International Stadium. As part of the planning process for the Doha games, the world-renowned event production agency, David Atkins Enterprises (DAE), was commissioned to conceive and produce the opening and closing ceremonies. Following this commission, DAE contracted Australian digital design and video production specialists, Digital Pulse, to produce the animated visuals for the opening ceremony including the athletes’ parade and cultural segments. Far from a conventional production canvas, the animated visuals that the Digital Pulse team were to produce for the event would have to play seamlessly across the stadium’s two different playback systems: a contiguous LED system installed behind all stadium seats and an 86-projector projection system that covered a world record 12,600 cubic metres of on-field projection space.   In less than three months, Digital Pulse produced the Journey to Light animation. The performance of Adobe After Effects and Adobe Premiere Pro were key factors in the team’s ability to meet such a tight timeline. The final animation included 450,000 individual (2D and 3D) video files, which grossed over 28TB of data. The final animation, Journey to Light, received widespread acclaim from attendees and viewers alike for its celebration of Arabic culture and message of unification, peace, and freedom for the 21 participating Arab nations. Adding to the depth of the experience, the animation produced by Digital Pulse was supported by a cast of more than 3,250 dancers, musicians, athletes, horsemen, and falconers and presented to an audience of 40,000 people. For details of how DAE and Digital Pulse use Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects, see this PDF document. The video captures some of the show’s highlights:    ...

read more

How Technology is Effecting Storytelling

Posted on May 31, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

How technology is influencing storytelling and filmmaking Michelle Gallina | 01/27 Watch the discussion unfold from award-winning panelists   Academy-award winning VFX Supervisor Rob Legato (Hugo, Titanic), and filmmakers/directors Vincent Laforet (Revelry, Mobius), and Jacob Rosenberg (Act of Valor, Waiting for Lightning) discuss the changing world of filmmaking. Moderated by Sharlto Copley (District 9), panelists dive into a discussion on the digital advances in filmmaking technology and innovative techniques to create engaging, thought-provoking work on any budget.    ...

read more

Createasphere Presents: The Immersive Dome Experience

Posted on May 30, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Createasphere Presents: The Immersive Dome Experience

Createasphere presents: Experience Immersion Technology with Ed Lantz Ed Lantz, Founder of Vortex Immersion Media and a major voice in immersive and full dome production, will share his visionary perspective. This Keynote presentation in the Vortex Dome included a showcase of immersive projects as well as conversation with content creators and experience makers that combines live action, VFX, 3D, and...

read more

You Tube’s Exponential Growth!

Posted on May 25, 2012 in Future Trends Blog, Uncategorized

Now Serving The Latest In Exponential Growth: YouTube! by David J. Hill May 25th, 2012 YouTube is growing exponentially thanks in part to mobile access. It goes without saying that YouTube has become the quintessential online video source for amateurs and professionals alike, but on the service’s seven-year anniversary, Google made quite a startling announcement: 72 hours of video are uploaded every single minute. That’s three entire days worth of cat videos, webcam rants, conference proceedings, news interviews, and company marketing fodder that is quietly swelling hard drives that already serve up four billion videos a day. According to the YouTube statistics page (which still needs to be updated with the latest numbers), more video is uploaded in one month that the three major networks in the US have generated in 60 years and over 3 billion hours of video is watched per month. Yikes! However, the biggest surprise of all is that YouTube, which was founded in 2005, is not only growing, but it’s growing exponentially. With the ease of access the Internet provides and the growing number of people gaining access through mobile devices, media is clearly accelerating, but just how fast is fast? A growth chart to the right from Forbes makes it quite clear that uploads are going exponential. This is likely fueled by mobile access, which gets over 600 million views a day and tripled in 2011. YouTube has become part of the culture to the extent that both national and local news routinely pull videos from it for segments instead of producing their own. There’s so much video that for April Fool’s 2012, the site jokingly advertized the option to buy the entire “YouTube Collection” video library on DVD, which would come out to be 555,000 discs. But it’s hard to say whether this amazing growth trend can continue or whether it will eventually flatten out. Considering that Google has invested $200 million to partner with select media groups to create specialized channels, priming YouTube into a more robust competitor to television, and positioning itself along with Netflix and Hulu to encourage people to ditch their cable for good. Of course, with every video comes the opportunity for Google’s AdSense to bring in the advertising dollars, and companies like Vevo introducing much maligned commercials before music videos. YouTube has also started expanding merchandise opportunities to all of its partners using CafePress, which is yet another avenue for it to monetize its free video offerings. Google has been on a tear lately breaking another growth milestone with the recent finding that Google Chrome has become the most used web browser, surpassing Microsoft Internet Explorer for the first time. So if you’re apt to reminisce about YouTube’s journey over the past seven years, check out this celebratory...

read more

Hack the Cover

Posted on May 25, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Hack the Cover COVERS, COVERS — EVERYWHERE — Craig Mod, May 2012 Muerto! The covers are dead! Dead! Dead like the record jacket! Dead like the laser disc sleeve! Dead like the 8-track cartridge sticker! Dead like the squishy Disney VHS container! Dead like the cassette case inserts! Dead like those damned CD jewel cases and their booklets! Dead like DVD and Blue-ray box art! Put ’em all in a box, burn ’em, and sprinkle their ashes over your razed local bookstore. Call it a day. Hang up your exact-o knifes and weld shut your drawers of metal type. The writing’s not on the wall but it was on one of those covers you just lit on fire — so we’ll never know what it said. Next! OK — phew. Still here? Great. If digital covers as we know them are so ‘dead,’ why do we hold them so gingerly? Treat them like print covers? We can’t hurt them. They’re dead. So let’s start hacking. Pull them apart, cut them into bits and see what we come up with. This is an essay for book lovers and designers curious about where the cover has been, where it’s going, and what the ethos of covers means for digital book design. It’s for those of us dissatisfied with thoughtlessly transferring print assets to digital and closing our eyes. The cover as we know it really is — gasp — ‘dead.’ But it’s dead because the way we touch digital books is different than the way we touch physical books. And once you acknowledge that, useful corollaries emerge. Leather-bound Paula Fox writes in her memoir, The Coldest Winter: “I touched his signature as though it had been his face.”1 It’s this kind of intimacy with which we touch physical books, too. We don’t want the cover to disappear. And so we don’t want the cover to disappear. And yet the cover as we have known it is disappearing, rather quickly (nearly eradicated on hardware Kindles). This doesn’t mean it won’t be replaced. Whatever it’s replaced with, however, will not serve the same purpose as the covers with which we’ve grown up. This romanticism is curious, if only because the cover of whose loss we lament is a recent invention. Matthew Battles writes in his book, Library: An Unquiet History: “The people who shelve the books in Widener talk about the library’s breathing — at the start of the term, the stacks exhale books in great swirling clouds; at end of term, the library inhales, and the books fly back.”2 I can’t help but imagine all these flying books as leather bound. Thick, dusty, uniform and effectively ‘coverless’ by modern standards. Place them face-up on a table and they look identical: shielded and important but also anonymous. Only the scuffs and wear in the leather tell a story. And that story doesn’t say much about what’s inside. Here, the cover is a protector of the signatures and the binding. It allows the books to fly in and out of the stacks a thousand times, and still be usable. In the digital world, our books are protected by ubiquity. They are everywhere and nowhere. They multiply effortlessly and can fly continuously without damage or rot. They don’t need covers like printed book need covers. Kinokuniya & Delight My awareness and relationship with covers began nearly a decade ago. I was nineteen when I walked into Kinokuniya on the...

read more

Transmedia in 21st Century Education

Posted on May 20, 2012 in Future Trends Blog

Transmedia in 21st Century From a Blog by Dr. Marilyn Hill The Community of Education Leaders recently discussed “Transmedia in Education” on GETideas.org. The major thread of the conversation was that today’s students are vastly different from their predecessors and that education must change to meet their needs. Simon Pulman expressed, “Educators and administrators who do not move quickly to incorporate digital learning and cross-platform thinking into the curriculum will do a disservice to students.” Lucas Johnson affirmed that people do not live within a single medium at a time. Instead, they continually “immerse themselves across multiple medias — reading, watching, listening, touching.” A high quality 21st Century education must challenge students to “evaluate biases, see problems from different perspectives, and examine the credibility of each information source” (Pulman). Most topics can be explored in greater depth through sources outside the classroom. Students can build a personal voice through creative use of multiple platforms. Educators must understand how information flows from one media platform to the next. Only then will they be able to design interactive experiences that produce meaningful learning for...

read more