You Tube’s Exponential Growth!

Now Serving The Latest In Exponential Growth: YouTube! by David J. Hill May 25th, 2012 YouTube is growing exponentially thanks in part to mobile access. It goes without saying that YouTube has become the quintessential online video source for amateurs and professionals alike, but on the service’s seven-year anniversary, Google made quite a startling announcement: 72 hours of video are uploaded every single minute. That’s three entire days worth of cat videos, webcam rants, conference proceedings, news interviews, and company marketing fodder that is quietly swelling hard drives that already serve up four billion videos a day. According to the YouTube statistics page (which still needs to be updated with the latest numbers), more video is uploaded in one month that the three major networks in the US have generated in 60 years and over 3 billion hours of video is watched per month. Yikes! However, the biggest surprise of all is that YouTube, which was founded in 2005, is not only growing, but it’s growing exponentially. With the ease of access the Internet provides and the growing number of people gaining access through mobile devices, media is clearly accelerating, but just how fast is fast? A growth chart to the right from Forbes makes it quite clear that uploads are going exponential. This is likely fueled by mobile access, which gets over 600 million views a day and tripled in 2011. YouTube has become part of the culture to the extent that both national and local news routinely pull videos from it for segments instead of producing their own. There’s so much video that for April Fool’s 2012, the site jokingly advertized the option to buy the entire “YouTube Collection” video library on DVD, which would come out to be 555,000 discs. But it’s hard to say whether this amazing growth trend can continue or whether it will eventually flatten out. Considering that Google has invested $200 million to partner with select media groups to create specialized channels, priming YouTube into a more robust competitor to television, and positioning itself along with Netflix and Hulu to encourage people to ditch their cable for good. Of course, with every video comes the opportunity for Google’s AdSense to bring in the advertising dollars, and companies like Vevo introducing much maligned commercials before music videos. YouTube has also started expanding merchandise opportunities to all of its partners using CafePress, which is yet another avenue for it to monetize its free video offerings. Google has been on a tear lately breaking another growth milestone with the recent finding that Google Chrome has become the most used web browser, surpassing Microsoft Internet Explorer for the first time. So if you’re apt to reminisce about YouTube’s journey over the past seven years, check out this celebratory...

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Time Traveler – Machinima at Its Best

  Time Traveler

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100 Ideas That Changed Film

100 Ideas That Changed Film by Maria Popova How the seventh art went from magic lanterns to state-of-the-art computer-generated imagery in 100 years. When a small handful of enthusiasts gathered at the first cinema show at the Grand Cafe in Paris on December 27, 1895, to celebrate early experimental film, they didn’t know that over the next century, their fringe fascination would carve its place in history as the “seventh art.” But how, exactly, did that happen? In 100 Ideas that Changed Film, Oxford Times film reviewer David Parkinson and publisher Laurence King — who brought us 100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design and the epic Saul Bass monograph — offer a concise and intelligent chronicle of the most influential developments since the dawn of cinema. From technologies like magic lanterns (#1), the kinetoscope (#3), and the handheld camera (#78), to genres like slapstick (#21), poetic realism (#50), and queer cinema (#97), to system-level developments like the star system (#23), film schools (#38), and censorship (#48), to cultural phenomena like fan magazines (#31), television (#63), and feminist film theory (#86), the book blends the illuminating factuality of an encyclopedia with the strong point of view of a museum curator to reveal, beneath this changing flow of technologies and techniques, cinema’s deeper capacity for playing on universal emotions and engaging our timeless longing for escapism, entertainment, and self-expression. Parkinson promises in the introduction: What follows is as much a chronology of business opportunism and technical pragmatism, as a celebration of artistry, social commitment, and showmanship. Idea # 1: MAGIC LANTERNS Images from a set of 24 glass slides based on Sir John Tenniel’s original drawings for Alice in Wonderland   These optical lanterns contained the principal elements later found in film projectors: a source of illumination; a mechanism for moving frames through the light-proofed casing; and lenses for condensing and projecting images onto a distant screen. As an early form of mass entertainment, they also anticipated the storytelling experiments of later filmmakers. Idea # 20: SERIALS Betty Hutton relives the glory days of the silent serial in The Perils of Pauline, a 1947 biopic of the legendary chapterplay heroine, Pearl White.   Over 470 serials were produced in the United States between 1912 and 1956. In telling continuous stories in 10-15 weekly episodes of 15-25 minutes each, chapterplays, as they were also known, helped turn moviegoing into a habit. Idea # 28: GENRE Alfred Hitchcock so excelled at the thriller that he was nicknamed ‘The Master of Suspense’.   Idea # 36: EXPRESSIONISM This poster for The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) conveys the angularity of the stars and Walter Röhrig, Hermann Warm and Walter Reimann’s sets.   Employing exterior or objective representation to convey interior or subjective stats, the silent Schauerfilme (horror films), Kammerspielfilme (chamber dramas), and Strassenfilme(street films) produced in Weimar Germany between 1919 and 1929 continue to have a major influence on world cinema. Idea # 44: MUSICAL SCORES Riffing on the notes E and F, John Williams’s ‘shark’ theme proved crucial to ratcheting up the suspense in Jaws (1975).   Idea # 52: B MOVIES Shot in just three weeks, Jean Rollin’s Lèvres de Sang (1975) is a superior example of the erotic European horror Bs produced in the 1960s and ’70s.   Idea # 54: SHORTS Ben Turpin crosses Charlie Chaplin in Essanay’s two-reel lampoon of showbiz types, His New Job (1915).   Idea # 61: THE BLACKLIST A protest supporting the Hollywood Ten – Alvah Bessie, Herbert Biberman, Lester Cole, Edward Dmytryk, Ring Lardner, Jr., John Howard Lawson, Albert Maltz, Samuel Ornitz, Adrian Scott and Dalton Trumbo.   The impact of the House UnAmerican Activities Committee’s investigation into Communism in HOllywood can...

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Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art

Neil deGrasse Tyson on Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art by Maria Popova “Every child is a scientist.” Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson may well be the Richard Feynman of our day, a “Great Explainer” in his own right, having previously reflected on everything from the urgency of space exploration to the most humbling fact about the universe. In this short video, Tyson contributes a beautiful addition to this omnibus of notable definitions of science and explores subjects as diverse as the nature of originality and the future of artificial intelligence. Watch and take notes. I can’t think of any more human activity than conducting science experiments. Think about it — what do kids do? … They’re turning over rocks, they’re plucking petals off a rose — they’re exploring their environment through experimentation. That’s what we do as human beings, and we do that more thoroughly and better than any other species on Earth that we have yet encountered… We explore our environment more than we are compelled to utter poetry when we’re toddlers — we start doing that later. Before that happens, every child is a scientist. And so when I think of science, I think of a truly human activity — something fundamental to our DNA, something that drives curiosity. One particularly interesting line of thought examines the difference between originality in science and originality in art — a refreshing complement to last week’s tangential musings on the subject by Mark Twain and Henry Miller. If I discover a scientific idea, surely someone else would’ve discovered the same idea had I not done so. Whereas, look at Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” — if he didn’t paint “Starry Night,” nobody’s gonna paint “Starry Night.” So, in that regard, the arts are more individual to the creative person than a scientific idea is to the one who comes up with it — but, nonetheless, they are both human activities. Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign...

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10 Producers Who Will Change Hollywood in 2012

From THE WRAP Even Brian Grazer started with a little movie called “Splash,” starring a then-unknown Tom Hanks. True, that was a Disney movie, but the days when new producers can align with major studios are long gone. Now, to get a project off the ground, it takes workaday jacks-of-all-trades who spend their days scrambling to find projects and the money to finance them. And even when they taste success, they’re still juggling. “When ‘Margin Call’ won an Independent Spirit Award — and I have it on my mantle at home — it felt pretty great,” Neal Dodson, a partner with Zachary Quinto and Corey Moosa at Before the Door Pictures, told TheWrap. Also read: More Producers Who Are Making a Mark on Hollywood At the same time, “the first major benchmark for us will be a time when our movies aren’t sort of hand-to-mouth. Right now, we’re basically making fees on our movies that allow us to extend the life of our company for ‘X’ number of months,” he said. “I’d love to not be movie-to-movie. I’d like to be – movie to two movies.” Dodson, Moosa and Quinto — better known as “Star Trek’s” latest Spock — are among the most interesting young producers in Hollywood. Their projects are ambitious, challenging and successful. Also read: Michael Benaroya: Film Financier to Watch TheWrap has identified nine more like them: Hollywood’s future Grazers (and Robert Rodriguezes and Kevin Smiths). They are listed in alphabetical order. Keep your eye on them. ANNAPURNA PICTURES Megan Ellison The daughter of billionaire Oracle founder Larry Ellison, Megan Ellison has the financial ability to do pretty much what she pleases. And she’s chosen to make movies. Good ones. With talented directors. Her Annapurna Pictures has worked with Spike Jonze, Kathryn Bigelow and Paul Thomas Anderson. She executive produced 2010’s Oscar-nominated “True Grit” and smaller projects like 2010’s “Main Street,” starring Colin Firth and Ellen Burstyn. Her production company is executive producer on “Cogan’s Trade,” starring Brad Pitt, Ray Liotta and James Gandolfini, and producer of “Lawless,” both slated for release later this year by the Weinstein Co. Also read: The Ellison Kids: Billionaire Producers Making Their Mark on Hollywood “Cogan’s Trade,” is a mob drama from director Andrew Dominick, whose last film was the acclaimed “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.” “Lawless” is about a gang of bootleggers during the Depression who are threatened by authorities who want a cut of their action. The John Hillcoat film, which was formerly titled “The Wettest County,” stars Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Jessica Chastain, Guy Pearce and Shia LaBeouf.  With four projects in post-production and another filming, Ellison has established herself and her company as a significant force in Hollywood based on the quality of her output, even as she has remained low-key, shunning interview requests and the spotlight. To read the complete story visit the website at link at top of...

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Games Beyond Entertainment: Applying Positive Psychology to Games

GAMES BEYOND ENTERTAINMENT:  APPLYING POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY TO GAMES by Dennis Scimeca As found in Gamasutra   “Psychology has had a very strange vision of the human condition,” said Dr. Martin Seligman at this week’s Gamasutra-attended Games Beyond Entertainment conference in Boston. “It comes from Schopenhauer and then Freud, and says ‘The best we can do in life, our highest aspiration, should be not to suffer, not to be miserable.'” Seligman, professionally renowned director of Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, challenges that premise. He believes that video games can play a part in promoting human “flourishing.” This flourishing is composed of five elements: positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, and achievement, or PERMA. PERMA principles are what human beings do for their own sake when they’re free beings. They are also measurable, teachable and gameable. The education and health fields are potential applications for these principles, but the majority of Seligman’s application of PERMA has been conducted through the United States Army. Three years ago the Chief of Staff of the Army, George Casey, called Seligman to ask what positive psychology could do to alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, drug abuse, and divorce, all of which are common issues for soldiers. The result was a $150 million project to measure and teach resilience and positive psychology through the entire U.S. Army by shipping drill sergeants to the University of Pennsylvania for training in PERMA principles, and instituting annual tests to measure the effectiveness of this training on a million soldiers over the course of their careers. Gamasutra, along with conference organizer Ben Sawyer, spoke with Dr. Seligman to get some details as to how Seligman’s theory and his work might apply more concretely to video games. What are some games that teach PERMA principles? Dr. Martin Seligman: There are no games that teach PERMA principles now. My principle reasoning for being here with Ben is to rev up peoples’ interest in creating such games. Do you find any confluence between games that suggest these principles and those which do not, and games you want to continue playing versus those you abandon more rapidly? MS: I’m the wrong person to ask that. I’m online four hours a day, but I always play the same game. I play bridge four hours a day with 20,000 people. I’m going to do that until I drop. Ben Sawyer: Bridge is a complicated game. What goes on inside a complicated game like bridge that you think is interesting in general? MS: I almost became a professional bridge player, so I’ve played it at every level and in every circumstance, and the thing I like about internet bridge is that it’s pure. If I’m playing face to face bridge with someone, I’m very good at reading people psychologically. You really want bridge to be purified of the interpersonal cues which are extraneous to the game. So, internet bridge becomes very chess-like, and a very pure intellectual activity. BS: One of the things that we talk about in video games, and in the serious games space, is this notion that games are these incredible petri dishes where we can control variables, including purity of play, and how complex it is. Or, for example, building games about systems that interact in the real world but pulling them into a game, so that we can explore those systems without some of the noise that gets generated. It’s kind of interesting that you talk about looking for that purity of play, because I think that’s something that’s important to the serious games space in terms of looking for ways we measure...

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