Createasphere Presents: The Immersive Dome Experience

Createasphere presents: Experience Immersion Technology with Ed Lantz Ed Lantz, Founder of Vortex Immersion Media and a major voice in immersive and full dome production, will share his visionary perspective. This Keynote presentation in the Vortex Dome included a showcase of immersive projects as well as conversation with content creators and experience makers that combines live action, VFX, 3D, and...

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You Tube’s Exponential Growth!

Now Serving The Latest In Exponential Growth: YouTube! by David J. Hill May 25th, 2012 YouTube is growing exponentially thanks in part to mobile access. It goes without saying that YouTube has become the quintessential online video source for amateurs and professionals alike, but on the service’s seven-year anniversary, Google made quite a startling announcement: 72 hours of video are uploaded every single minute. That’s three entire days worth of cat videos, webcam rants, conference proceedings, news interviews, and company marketing fodder that is quietly swelling hard drives that already serve up four billion videos a day. According to the YouTube statistics page (which still needs to be updated with the latest numbers), more video is uploaded in one month that the three major networks in the US have generated in 60 years and over 3 billion hours of video is watched per month. Yikes! However, the biggest surprise of all is that YouTube, which was founded in 2005, is not only growing, but it’s growing exponentially. With the ease of access the Internet provides and the growing number of people gaining access through mobile devices, media is clearly accelerating, but just how fast is fast? A growth chart to the right from Forbes makes it quite clear that uploads are going exponential. This is likely fueled by mobile access, which gets over 600 million views a day and tripled in 2011. YouTube has become part of the culture to the extent that both national and local news routinely pull videos from it for segments instead of producing their own. There’s so much video that for April Fool’s 2012, the site jokingly advertized the option to buy the entire “YouTube Collection” video library on DVD, which would come out to be 555,000 discs. But it’s hard to say whether this amazing growth trend can continue or whether it will eventually flatten out. Considering that Google has invested $200 million to partner with select media groups to create specialized channels, priming YouTube into a more robust competitor to television, and positioning itself along with Netflix and Hulu to encourage people to ditch their cable for good. Of course, with every video comes the opportunity for Google’s AdSense to bring in the advertising dollars, and companies like Vevo introducing much maligned commercials before music videos. YouTube has also started expanding merchandise opportunities to all of its partners using CafePress, which is yet another avenue for it to monetize its free video offerings. Google has been on a tear lately breaking another growth milestone with the recent finding that Google Chrome has become the most used web browser, surpassing Microsoft Internet Explorer for the first time. So if you’re apt to reminisce about YouTube’s journey over the past seven years, check out this celebratory...

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Hack the Cover

Hack the Cover COVERS, COVERS — EVERYWHERE — Craig Mod, May 2012 Muerto! The covers are dead! Dead! Dead like the record jacket! Dead like the laser disc sleeve! Dead like the 8-track cartridge sticker! Dead like the squishy Disney VHS container! Dead like the cassette case inserts! Dead like those damned CD jewel cases and their booklets! Dead like DVD and Blue-ray box art! Put ’em all in a box, burn ’em, and sprinkle their ashes over your razed local bookstore. Call it a day. Hang up your exact-o knifes and weld shut your drawers of metal type. The writing’s not on the wall but it was on one of those covers you just lit on fire — so we’ll never know what it said. Next! OK — phew. Still here? Great. If digital covers as we know them are so ‘dead,’ why do we hold them so gingerly? Treat them like print covers? We can’t hurt them. They’re dead. So let’s start hacking. Pull them apart, cut them into bits and see what we come up with. This is an essay for book lovers and designers curious about where the cover has been, where it’s going, and what the ethos of covers means for digital book design. It’s for those of us dissatisfied with thoughtlessly transferring print assets to digital and closing our eyes. The cover as we know it really is — gasp — ‘dead.’ But it’s dead because the way we touch digital books is different than the way we touch physical books. And once you acknowledge that, useful corollaries emerge. Leather-bound Paula Fox writes in her memoir, The Coldest Winter: “I touched his signature as though it had been his face.”1 It’s this kind of intimacy with which we touch physical books, too. We don’t want the cover to disappear. And so we don’t want the cover to disappear. And yet the cover as we have known it is disappearing, rather quickly (nearly eradicated on hardware Kindles). This doesn’t mean it won’t be replaced. Whatever it’s replaced with, however, will not serve the same purpose as the covers with which we’ve grown up. This romanticism is curious, if only because the cover of whose loss we lament is a recent invention. Matthew Battles writes in his book, Library: An Unquiet History: “The people who shelve the books in Widener talk about the library’s breathing — at the start of the term, the stacks exhale books in great swirling clouds; at end of term, the library inhales, and the books fly back.”2 I can’t help but imagine all these flying books as leather bound. Thick, dusty, uniform and effectively ‘coverless’ by modern standards. Place them face-up on a table and they look identical: shielded and important but also anonymous. Only the scuffs and wear in the leather tell a story. And that story doesn’t say much about what’s inside. Here, the cover is a protector of the signatures and the binding. It allows the books to fly in and out of the stacks a thousand times, and still be usable. In the digital world, our books are protected by ubiquity. They are everywhere and nowhere. They multiply effortlessly and can fly continuously without damage or rot. They don’t need covers like printed book need covers. Kinokuniya & Delight My awareness and relationship with covers began nearly a decade ago. I was nineteen when I walked into Kinokuniya on the east side of Shinjuku station. At the time I knew nothing about Japan or making books. It was my first visit to a Japanese bookstore and, like most of my experiences then with things Japanese, I was amused, full of curiosity, and inspired. The place was bathed in a typically...

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Transmedia in 21st Century Education

Transmedia in 21st Century From a Blog by Dr. Marilyn Hill The Community of Education Leaders recently discussed “Transmedia in Education” on GETideas.org. The major thread of the conversation was that today’s students are vastly different from their predecessors and that education must change to meet their needs. Simon Pulman expressed, “Educators and administrators who do not move quickly to incorporate digital learning and cross-platform thinking into the curriculum will do a disservice to students.” Lucas Johnson affirmed that people do not live within a single medium at a time. Instead, they continually “immerse themselves across multiple medias — reading, watching, listening, touching.” A high quality 21st Century education must challenge students to “evaluate biases, see problems from different perspectives, and examine the credibility of each information source” (Pulman). Most topics can be explored in greater depth through sources outside the classroom. Students can build a personal voice through creative use of multiple platforms. Educators must understand how information flows from one media platform to the next. Only then will they be able to design interactive experiences that produce meaningful learning for...

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100 Ideas That Changed Film

100 Ideas That Changed Film by Maria Popova How the seventh art went from magic lanterns to state-of-the-art computer-generated imagery in 100 years. When a small handful of enthusiasts gathered at the first cinema show at the Grand Cafe in Paris on December 27, 1895, to celebrate early experimental film, they didn’t know that over the next century, their fringe fascination would carve its place in history as the “seventh art.” But how, exactly, did that happen? In 100 Ideas that Changed Film, Oxford Times film reviewer David Parkinson and publisher Laurence King — who brought us 100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design and the epic Saul Bass monograph — offer a concise and intelligent chronicle of the most influential developments since the dawn of cinema. From technologies like magic lanterns (#1), the kinetoscope (#3), and the handheld camera (#78), to genres like slapstick (#21), poetic realism (#50), and queer cinema (#97), to system-level developments like the star system (#23), film schools (#38), and censorship (#48), to cultural phenomena like fan magazines (#31), television (#63), and feminist film theory (#86), the book blends the illuminating factuality of an encyclopedia with the strong point of view of a museum curator to reveal, beneath this changing flow of technologies and techniques, cinema’s deeper capacity for playing on universal emotions and engaging our timeless longing for escapism, entertainment, and self-expression. Parkinson promises in the introduction: What follows is as much a chronology of business opportunism and technical pragmatism, as a celebration of artistry, social commitment, and showmanship. Idea # 1: MAGIC LANTERNS Images from a set of 24 glass slides based on Sir John Tenniel’s original drawings for Alice in Wonderland   These optical lanterns contained the principal elements later found in film projectors: a source of illumination; a mechanism for moving frames through the light-proofed casing; and lenses for condensing and projecting images onto a distant screen. As an early form of mass entertainment, they also anticipated the storytelling experiments of later filmmakers. Idea # 20: SERIALS Betty Hutton relives the glory days of the silent serial in The Perils of Pauline, a 1947 biopic of the legendary chapterplay heroine, Pearl White.   Over 470 serials were produced in the United States between 1912 and 1956. In telling continuous stories in 10-15 weekly episodes of 15-25 minutes each, chapterplays, as they were also known, helped turn moviegoing into a habit. Idea # 28: GENRE Alfred Hitchcock so excelled at the thriller that he was nicknamed ‘The Master of Suspense’.   Idea # 36: EXPRESSIONISM This poster for The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) conveys the angularity of the stars and Walter Röhrig, Hermann Warm and Walter Reimann’s sets.   Employing exterior or objective representation to convey interior or subjective stats, the silent Schauerfilme (horror films), Kammerspielfilme (chamber dramas), and Strassenfilme(street films) produced in Weimar Germany between 1919 and 1929 continue to have a major influence on world cinema. Idea # 44: MUSICAL SCORES Riffing on the notes E and F, John Williams’s ‘shark’ theme proved crucial to ratcheting up the suspense in Jaws (1975).   Idea # 52: B MOVIES Shot in just three weeks, Jean Rollin’s Lèvres de Sang (1975) is a superior example of the erotic European horror Bs produced in the 1960s and ’70s.   Idea # 54: SHORTS Ben Turpin crosses Charlie Chaplin in Essanay’s two-reel lampoon of showbiz types, His New Job (1915).   Idea # 61: THE BLACKLIST A protest supporting the Hollywood Ten – Alvah Bessie, Herbert Biberman, Lester Cole, Edward Dmytryk, Ring Lardner, Jr., John Howard Lawson, Albert Maltz, Samuel Ornitz, Adrian Scott and Dalton Trumbo.   The impact of the House UnAmerican Activities Committee’s investigation into Communism in HOllywood can...

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Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art

Neil deGrasse Tyson on Why We’re Wired for Science & How Originality Differs in Science vs. Art by Maria Popova “Every child is a scientist.” Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson may well be the Richard Feynman of our day, a “Great Explainer” in his own right, having previously reflected on everything from the urgency of space exploration to the most humbling fact about the universe. In this short video, Tyson contributes a beautiful addition to this omnibus of notable definitions of science and explores subjects as diverse as the nature of originality and the future of artificial intelligence. Watch and take notes. I can’t think of any more human activity than conducting science experiments. Think about it — what do kids do? … They’re turning over rocks, they’re plucking petals off a rose — they’re exploring their environment through experimentation. That’s what we do as human beings, and we do that more thoroughly and better than any other species on Earth that we have yet encountered… We explore our environment more than we are compelled to utter poetry when we’re toddlers — we start doing that later. Before that happens, every child is a scientist. And so when I think of science, I think of a truly human activity — something fundamental to our DNA, something that drives curiosity. One particularly interesting line of thought examines the difference between originality in science and originality in art — a refreshing complement to last week’s tangential musings on the subject by Mark Twain and Henry Miller. If I discover a scientific idea, surely someone else would’ve discovered the same idea had I not done so. Whereas, look at Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” — if he didn’t paint “Starry Night,” nobody’s gonna paint “Starry Night.” So, in that regard, the arts are more individual to the creative person than a scientific idea is to the one who comes up with it — but, nonetheless, they are both human activities. Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter and people say it’s cool. It comes out on Sundays and offers the week’s best articles. Here’s what to expect. Like? Sign...

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