How Technology is Effecting Storytelling

How technology is influencing storytelling and filmmaking Michelle Gallina | 01/27 Watch the discussion unfold from award-winning panelists   Academy-award winning VFX Supervisor Rob Legato (Hugo, Titanic), and filmmakers/directors Vincent Laforet (Revelry, Mobius), and Jacob Rosenberg (Act of Valor, Waiting for Lightning) discuss the changing world of filmmaking. Moderated by Sharlto Copley (District 9), panelists dive into a discussion on the digital advances in filmmaking technology and innovative techniques to create engaging, thought-provoking work on any budget.    ...

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Createasphere Presents: The Immersive Dome Experience

Createasphere presents: Experience Immersion Technology with Ed Lantz Ed Lantz, Founder of Vortex Immersion Media and a major voice in immersive and full dome production, will share his visionary perspective. This Keynote presentation in the Vortex Dome included a showcase of immersive projects as well as conversation with content creators and experience makers that combines live action, VFX, 3D, and...

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You Tube’s Exponential Growth!

Now Serving The Latest In Exponential Growth: YouTube! by David J. Hill May 25th, 2012 YouTube is growing exponentially thanks in part to mobile access. It goes without saying that YouTube has become the quintessential online video source for amateurs and professionals alike, but on the service’s seven-year anniversary, Google made quite a startling announcement: 72 hours of video are uploaded every single minute. That’s three entire days worth of cat videos, webcam rants, conference proceedings, news interviews, and company marketing fodder that is quietly swelling hard drives that already serve up four billion videos a day. According to the YouTube statistics page (which still needs to be updated with the latest numbers), more video is uploaded in one month that the three major networks in the US have generated in 60 years and over 3 billion hours of video is watched per month. Yikes! However, the biggest surprise of all is that YouTube, which was founded in 2005, is not only growing, but it’s growing exponentially. With the ease of access the Internet provides and the growing number of people gaining access through mobile devices, media is clearly accelerating, but just how fast is fast? A growth chart to the right from Forbes makes it quite clear that uploads are going exponential. This is likely fueled by mobile access, which gets over 600 million views a day and tripled in 2011. YouTube has become part of the culture to the extent that both national and local news routinely pull videos from it for segments instead of producing their own. There’s so much video that for April Fool’s 2012, the site jokingly advertized the option to buy the entire “YouTube Collection” video library on DVD, which would come out to be 555,000 discs. But it’s hard to say whether this amazing growth trend can continue or whether it will eventually flatten out. Considering that Google has invested $200 million to partner with select media groups to create specialized channels, priming YouTube into a more robust competitor to television, and positioning itself along with Netflix and Hulu to encourage people to ditch their cable for good. Of course, with every video comes the opportunity for Google’s AdSense to bring in the advertising dollars, and companies like Vevo introducing much maligned commercials before music videos. YouTube has also started expanding merchandise opportunities to all of its partners using CafePress, which is yet another avenue for it to monetize its free video offerings. Google has been on a tear lately breaking another growth milestone with the recent finding that Google Chrome has become the most used web browser, surpassing Microsoft Internet Explorer for the first time. So if you’re apt to reminisce about YouTube’s journey over the past seven years, check out this celebratory...

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Reinventing Health Monitoring

Published: May 24, 2012 Reinventing Health Monitoring: Peter Diamandis, MD on the New Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE Nokia and the X PRIZE Foundation have teamed up to launch the Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE, which will award $2.25 million to a team that develops the most innovative biosensors. The winner will be chosen by a non-partisan judging panel of industry experts. The competition will be divided into a series of three events, which will take place over the next three years. The winners of each competition will be the teams that submit best in class technology as determined by a non-partisan judging panel of cross-functional industry experts. By: Brian Buntz The award could help usher in an age where consumers are able to wirelessly monitor a variety of health metrics ranging from their pulse rate to their brain waves, which will be beamed to a user’s smartphone, putting that data in the palm of their hand. There is a good case to be made for the potential of improved patient monitoring to improve outcomes. FCC chairman Julius Genachowski recently spoke to that point at a press conference, explaining that a monitored patient has a 48% chance of surviving a cardiac arrest while the survival rate for unmonitored patients was 6% chance. The award joins the Qualcomm Tricorder X PRIZE and the Archon Genomics X PRIZE as the third active life sciences competition from the X PRIZE Foundation. To learn more about the competition,MD+DI editor at large Brian Buntz spoke with Peter Diamandis, MD, chairman and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation. Diamandis explains that the rate of progress in medicine is growing exponentially, and there is no way that we can keep up with that by preserving the status quo. This issue is important in the training of physicians as well. Not only does it take a long time to train doctors, but, as Diamandis explains in his book,Abundance, much of what is learned is eventually irrelevant. It is a common refrain heard in medical school: “five years after graduation, half of what one learns will probably be wrong—but no one know which half.” In this interview, Diamandis talks about this issue and a number of other topics related to how he envisions the future of healthcare. MD+DI: How do you envision the future of health sensors and sensing technologies? “In the future, you will have the data and the data analysis to become the CEO of your own health.” Peter Diamandis, MD: Today, my car, my airplane, my computer knows more about its health status than I do, which is insane. The future is one in which the fundamental health parameters of my body are constantly being monitored 24/7 as well as the air I breathe, the food I eat, the environment I walk through. There are no more excuses for not knowing about something. You have the data and the data analysis to become the CEO of your own health. In the future, you know the instant things start to go off kilter and you have the ability to intervene early. Those sensors and mechanisms for sensing are integrated into platforms like the Qualcomm tricorder and, ultimately, empower the individual because, today, healthcare is at best a few bytes of information that you get once a year when your doctor gives you their analysis. MD+DI: How do expect this competition to lead to cost savings in healthcare?  Diamandis: Today, if you are at home sick at 2:00 a.m. in the morning, you basically have one option: go the emergency room. That’s insane. We are living in a society that has an overtaxed, overbloated, bureaucratic healthcare system...

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Hack the Cover

Hack the Cover COVERS, COVERS — EVERYWHERE — Craig Mod, May 2012 Muerto! The covers are dead! Dead! Dead like the record jacket! Dead like the laser disc sleeve! Dead like the 8-track cartridge sticker! Dead like the squishy Disney VHS container! Dead like the cassette case inserts! Dead like those damned CD jewel cases and their booklets! Dead like DVD and Blue-ray box art! Put ’em all in a box, burn ’em, and sprinkle their ashes over your razed local bookstore. Call it a day. Hang up your exact-o knifes and weld shut your drawers of metal type. The writing’s not on the wall but it was on one of those covers you just lit on fire — so we’ll never know what it said. Next! OK — phew. Still here? Great. If digital covers as we know them are so ‘dead,’ why do we hold them so gingerly? Treat them like print covers? We can’t hurt them. They’re dead. So let’s start hacking. Pull them apart, cut them into bits and see what we come up with. This is an essay for book lovers and designers curious about where the cover has been, where it’s going, and what the ethos of covers means for digital book design. It’s for those of us dissatisfied with thoughtlessly transferring print assets to digital and closing our eyes. The cover as we know it really is — gasp — ‘dead.’ But it’s dead because the way we touch digital books is different than the way we touch physical books. And once you acknowledge that, useful corollaries emerge. Leather-bound Paula Fox writes in her memoir, The Coldest Winter: “I touched his signature as though it had been his face.”1 It’s this kind of intimacy with which we touch physical books, too. We don’t want the cover to disappear. And so we don’t want the cover to disappear. And yet the cover as we have known it is disappearing, rather quickly (nearly eradicated on hardware Kindles). This doesn’t mean it won’t be replaced. Whatever it’s replaced with, however, will not serve the same purpose as the covers with which we’ve grown up. This romanticism is curious, if only because the cover of whose loss we lament is a recent invention. Matthew Battles writes in his book, Library: An Unquiet History: “The people who shelve the books in Widener talk about the library’s breathing — at the start of the term, the stacks exhale books in great swirling clouds; at end of term, the library inhales, and the books fly back.”2 I can’t help but imagine all these flying books as leather bound. Thick, dusty, uniform and effectively ‘coverless’ by modern standards. Place them face-up on a table and they look identical: shielded and important but also anonymous. Only the scuffs and wear in the leather tell a story. And that story doesn’t say much about what’s inside. Here, the cover is a protector of the signatures and the binding. It allows the books to fly in and out of the stacks a thousand times, and still be usable. In the digital world, our books are protected by ubiquity. They are everywhere and nowhere. They multiply effortlessly and can fly continuously without damage or rot. They don’t need covers like printed book need covers. Kinokuniya & Delight My awareness and relationship with covers began nearly a decade ago. I was nineteen when I walked into Kinokuniya on the east side of Shinjuku station. At the time I knew nothing about Japan or making books. It was my first visit to a Japanese bookstore and, like most of my experiences then with things Japanese, I was amused, full of curiosity, and inspired. The place was bathed in a typically...

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